Archive of ‘Careers’ category

 

Our seventh annual WAM!NYC Gender Justice in Media Conference at Columbia University’s Barnard Center for Research on Women rocked!

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I got my co-board members to ‘pose-off’ and I had to throw up the peace sign

Our 2016 WAM!NYC Conference was a huge success! Our keynote speakers this year included Amy Goodman (of Democracy Now!), activist Linda Sarsour, and Ashley Nicole Black, of Samantha Bee, plus a full day of additional panels and workshops.

The words of my co-board member Martyna Starosta echo what many people say when they attend our WAM!NYC Justice in Media conference.

When I attended my first WAM!NYC conference, I walked into a room full of women & gender non conforming people & I thought “wow, this is it, we can have our own space for one day & talk about the issues that are important to us as media-makers & storytellers.”

Professionals who love creating, consuming, and critiquing media that deals with race, gender and more met up at our conference to get more tools, strategies, and ideas to do their work better. Read more about our keynote speakers below, and check back here for photos and other outtakes this weekend!

Chevon Drew, Board Member
Women Action & the Media,
New York City Chapter

WAM!NYC Gender Justice in Media Conference Keynotes

Amy Goodman is the host and executive producer of Democracy Now!, a national, daily, independent, award-winning news program airing on over 1,400 public television and radio stations worldwide. Goodman has co-authored six New York Times bestsellers. Her latest one, Democracy Now!: Twenty Years Covering the Movements Changing America, looks back over the past two decades of Democracy Now! and the powerful movements and charismatic leaders who are re-shaping our world.

Linda Sarsour is a leading racial justice and civil rights activist and one of the most sought-after media commentators on Islamophobia in the 2016 election. Sarsour is a Palestinian Muslim American born and raised in Brooklyn. She is the Executive Director of the Arab American Association of New York and co-founder of the first Muslim online organizing platform, MPOWER Change. She has been at the forefront of major civil rights campaigns including calling for an end to unwarranted surveillance of New York’s Muslim communities and ending police policies like stop and frisk. In wake of the police murder of Mike Brown, she co-founded Muslims for Ferguson to build solidarity amongst American Muslim communities and encourage work against police brutality. She was instrumental in the Coalition for Muslim School Holidays, which helped make New York City the largest school system in the country to officially recognize two Muslim high holidays. Among her numerous awards and honors, Sarsour has been named a “Champion of Change” by the White House.

Ashley Nicole Black is a comedy writer and performer, currently writing for Full Frontal with Samantha Bee. Ashley started writing and performing sketch comedy at Chicago’s Second City. She is a proud PhD dropout from Northwestern University.

 
 

Save The Date: June 25, 2016! WAM!NYC Conference

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Last year our WAM!NYC Gender Justice in the Media conference was headlined by the amazing co-founder of ‪#‎BlackLivesMatter‬, Alicia Garza.

We had an engaging day of panels on gender and racial justice in the media. Who do you want to see at this year’s conference on June 25? Tell us!

Share your opinion on who should speak at the conference or what panel topics should be covered. Just click here.

Sincerely,
Regina, Clarissa, Chevon, Amy and Victoria
[The WAM!NYC Board]

 

Join WAM!NYC for a WAMentoring session with Jamilah Lemieux, Senior Editor at EBONY magazine.

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Are you a woman looking for advice on how to take the next step in your career? Struggling to find mentorship in the digital media or journalism world?

Join us for WAMentoring, an informal conversation series with some of the most accomplished members of the NYC chapter of Women, Action & the Media (WAM!NYC).

This month’s mentor, Jamilah Lemieux is an award-winning, editor, writer, and speaker. She’s a leading millennial voice around issues of race, gender and sexuality. One of those pesky Black feminists who challenges the status quo, while remaining fresh and fab at all times.

Jamilah Lemieux’s work has appeared in Essence, Clutch, The Nation, the Washington Post, Gawker, and her award-winning blog, The Beautiful Struggler. In 2014, she was named to The Root 100 list of the nation’s most influential African Americans, as well as Fortune’s list of the most influential women on Twitter.

Light snacks and wine will be on deck as we delve into your deepest career-driven questions.

RSVP here – http://tinyurl.com/p9vr54w

 

Teaching Social Best Practices to Diverse Filmmakers 


I spoke to a group of filmmakers about the importance of social media and digital communications!
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I had a blast watching people’s eyes light up when I answered questions about how customized communications strategies can help them. I felt honored to be invited to speak.
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Need a consultation ?
Reach out to me at chevonmedia.com/contact !

 

Akiba Solomon Visits WAM!NYC For A WAMentor Session

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WAMNYC board member, Martya Starosta moderated our #WAMentor conversation with Akiba Solomon, Editor of @colorlinesnews. Check out some of Akiba’s thoughts on breaking into the magazine writing industry below.

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Akiba on hustling

  • Find different ways to write and make money. I’ve written copy for perm/relaxer boxes (which paid well), I’ve edited girls in #STEM websites, I’ve written fashion stories though I’m not big into fashion. I’m hustler there’s NO shame in hustling.
  • Learn copy editing. It’s a good hustle. And makes you better.
  • Try Fact-Checker jobs. It’s the unspoken affirmative action of the magazine world. (laughs) But really, it’s a place where the non-conformists can often get hired and get in.

Akiba on the writing life

  • If you’re trying to get into the business, be prepared to freelance for multiple publications.
  • Be kind. Keep in mind, as busy as you are, as overwhelmed as you are–so is an editor. Be kind, even if your check is late. Be polite when reaching out. Be thoughtful. Remain professional.

Akiba on networking

  • Professional affinity groups by ethnicity are an organized way to meet other people and climb that corporate latter as a group.
  • Don’t be your FULL self on social media unless it relates to the attention you want to get for the work you want to do. If you’re argumentative, that can follow you into closed door discussions and lose you freelance opportunities!

Akiba on who to write for

  • Find people who have good editors. Try to write for those publications. A good editor will help you grow.

Akiba told us about how she wrote her book, how to pitch her for Colorlines and more. Missed it? Better catch the next #WAMentoring event! Join WAM!NYC (Women Action & the Media NYC) here https://www.facebook.com/groups/366848420345/

WAM!NYC provides space for feminist media makers and activists to convene, build skills, and strategize on getting our voices more fully heard.